Get Through School Debt-Free

March 25, 2013 by

A friend told me about this great website and I am happy to share it with you. Check out Scholarships Canada. You may find this to be a useful website if your child is starting post-secondary education this year or is already in the midst of undergrad studies or interested in graduate school. 

Image courtesy of bplanet / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of bplanet / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

This wonderful website has extensive database of 32,390 Canadian scholarships, bursaries and grants, and only 81% of them are based on academic average. Some of them are based on financial need, particular field of study or student’s specific interest/activities.  The website also has useful information about student loans, applications and budget planning. I hope you find it bado cams useful. If this website is not for you or your child, please share this link with someone that may benefit from it.

 

2 Comments

  1. Chris Cummins

    Another way to leave college or university with little or no debt is to get paid to live in residence. My first year I paid to live there. My second, third and fourth years I was paid to live there. In second year I was and RA (residence advisor). Third and fourth years I was a Don (several RA's report to a Don). Two weeks before the school year begins you are paid to attend incredible leadership training programs and placed in a position to learn on-the-job everything from conflict intervention, difficult conversations, emergency management, suicide intervention, drug identification workshops, negotiation, train the trainer, time management, mediation and a lot more training that looks fantastic on a resume. THEN, you are paid every month and it covers all of your rent and food for the year.

    Oh, and by the way, you get a larger room. 🙂

    Keep up the good work. I enjoyed your posts.

    Sincerely,

    Chris.

  2. Maja

    Chris, thank you for your comment. What a wonderful idea to get paid to live in the residence and on top of that the money that you earn covers your food. I wish someone had told me this when I started university. I really wanted to experience the life in residence, but I couldn't afford it. Had I known of this back then, I would have applied to be RA in my first year.

    Some of my friends took programs in university that had paid co-op placements. Due to the co-op terms, these university programs were longer than typical 4 years, but were well worth the time spent as the money earned through the co-op was more than enough to cover tuition and books, while at the same time these students were learning new skills, getting valuable work experience and networking.

    If somehow a student could combine being RA, with a program that has paid co-op placements, s/he would have no problem getting out of school debt free.